Item #2567 [MANUSCRIPT] [HIGH SCHOOL] [DIVORCE] Gladstone Reed's Journal; March 11, 1910 - September 25, 1910. Gladstone Reed.
[MANUSCRIPT] [HIGH SCHOOL] [DIVORCE] Gladstone Reed's Journal; March 11, 1910 - September 25, 1910
[MANUSCRIPT] [HIGH SCHOOL] [DIVORCE] Gladstone Reed's Journal; March 11, 1910 - September 25, 1910

[MANUSCRIPT] [HIGH SCHOOL] [DIVORCE] Gladstone Reed's Journal; March 11, 1910 - September 25, 1910

Cardboard covers. Unpaginated (135 pages). 20 x 12.5 cm. "Friday, March 11, 09 - No letters, Borrowed a paper at noon. There was nothing about the divorce." This is the first three sentences Gladstone Reed wrote in his journal at the age of 16 while he attended boarding school (we believe it was The Belmont School for Boys - San Mateo, CA). Gladstone's parents Charles Wesley Reed and Ethelyn Minnie Watson Reed were in throws of a much publicized divorce case in his hometown of San Francisco that would last for over two years, making frequent headlines in the local papers.

Gladstone Reed came from a well-to-do family with some local history attached. His grandfather, Charles Wesley Reed Sr. was a pioneering horticulturist who selected his Bartlett pears for exclusive cultivation which in turn, was the first fresh fruit shipped from California. Reed Sr. was also known as the person to invent the ventilated fruit car for shipping. Gladstone's father, Charles Wesley Reed Jr. was a prosecuting attorney for San Francisco as well as a Supervisor.

Gladstone writes in his journal about many of the normal episodes in a young man's life - playing baseball, running track, cheering for his school teams, writing for the school paper, exchanging letters with girlfriends and family members. Gladstone also discusses the divorce. He mentions his mother telling him about the proceedings in court. Gladstone also contemplates his position between his parents as he alludes to the fact that he had advised his father to fight the divorce, even as his mother is aware of this. Gladstone reveals he will not take sides although he indicates he knows his father is "by no means the loving, gentle, considerate husband" that he should be.

Reading this one realizes that so many things have changed over the years but some things stay the same - the human condition is one of those things. Laid in is a newspaper article titled: Mrs. Reed to Try Matrimony Again - Divorced Wife of Lawyer to be Bride at Noon To-Day of J.D. Baker. Blue cardboard covers. Good. Item #2567

Price: $375.00

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