[AVIATION] [WOMEN] [AUTOGRAPH] Autograph Card of Pilot Laura Ingalls Affixed to Envelope; with Contemporary Newsclipping. Laura Ingalls.
[AVIATION] [WOMEN] [AUTOGRAPH] Autograph Card of Pilot Laura Ingalls Affixed to Envelope; with Contemporary Newsclipping
[AVIATION] [WOMEN] [AUTOGRAPH] Autograph Card of Pilot Laura Ingalls Affixed to Envelope; with Contemporary Newsclipping

[AVIATION] [WOMEN] [AUTOGRAPH] Autograph Card of Pilot Laura Ingalls Affixed to Envelope; with Contemporary Newsclipping

Chicago: 1930. Loose_leaf. Envelope - 9.5 x 16.5 cm. Autograph card, affixed onto airmail envelope dated May 13th, 1930, dated shortly after Laura Ingalls broke an aviation record - addressed, in print, to Mr. York Briddell of St. Petersburg, Florida - Director of the American Air Mail Society. Accompanied by a clipped article from the May 4th, 1930 Chicago Evening Post, Pertaining to Ingalls' breaking the women's record for consecutive loops in an airplane.

Laura Ingalls (1893-1967) was a highly successful female pilot of the 1930's with numerous records as a stunt pilot and achieved multiple firsts as an aviatrix - among them the longest solo flight by a woman (17,000 miles), first solo flight by a woman from North to South America, first solo flight around South America by man or woman, and first American woman to fly the Andes solo. But as war with Germany overshadowed the late 1930's, Ingalls charming demeanor gave way to more destructive behavior by flying over Washington, D.C. on Sept. 26, 1939 to drop one-page antiwar pamphlets which brought sanctions and some bad press. Ten days after the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor in 1941 and America declared war against Japan, Germany and Italy, U.S. officials charged Ingalls with being an unregistered agent for the German Reich. It seems Ingalls used her award-winning celebrity and talent to take money from Baron Ulrich von Gienanth, the second secretary of the German Embassy. Ingalls was charged and convicted of failing to register with the government as a paid Nazi agent and was sentenced to prison on February 20, 1942 and released on October 5, 1943 after serving 20 months. After her release she wrote about the Normandy landings: "This whole invasion is a power lust, blood drunk orgy in a war which is unholy and for which the U.S. will be called to terrible accounting...They [the Nazis] fight the common enemy. They fight for independence of Europe - independence from the Jews. Bravo!" Envelope faintly soiled, autograph clean. Minor soiling to newspaper clipping. Red, white, and blue envelope. Very good. Item #2280

Price: $75.00

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