[NURSING] [SURGERY] [NEW YORK] Surgery Journal and Nursing school Manuscript; Miss Rice's Book of Operations. L. A. Rice.
[NURSING] [SURGERY] [NEW YORK] Surgery Journal and Nursing school Manuscript; Miss Rice's Book of Operations
[NURSING] [SURGERY] [NEW YORK] Surgery Journal and Nursing school Manuscript; Miss Rice's Book of Operations
[NURSING] [SURGERY] [NEW YORK] Surgery Journal and Nursing school Manuscript; Miss Rice's Book of Operations
[NURSING] [SURGERY] [NEW YORK] Surgery Journal and Nursing school Manuscript; Miss Rice's Book of Operations

[NURSING] [SURGERY] [NEW YORK] Surgery Journal and Nursing school Manuscript; Miss Rice's Book of Operations

New York: 1917 & 1918. Two Manuscripts written by L.A. Rice (Miss Rice). Small journal, 22 x 10 cm., with label affixed: L.A. Rice Oct. 23rd, 1917, P.G. Hosp - contains notes, presumably taken during a class given by Dr. Abramhams. These records are primarily comprised of guidance on treating patients with critical health conditions such as congenital heart disease and tuberculosis. Black cloth covered boards, lined paper with pencil present. Large journal, 30.5 x 14.5 cm., is the handwritten daily history of operations begining April 8th 1918 with the last noted - September 6th 1920 (1071 surgeries). Record includes: date, patients name, type of operation, type of anestetia and duration of anestia, operation time span, doctor's name performing operation and amount of pills administered. After researching, we came to the conclusion these surgeries were preformed at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York City. Many of the doctors noted went on to have celebrated careers: Dr. Joseph Bretauer attended to Gustav Mahler and in mentioned in the book Gustav Mahler; A life in Crisis. Dr. Eliz Moschcowitz (1879-1964), a specialist in internal medicine and a one time Medical Director of Mt. Sinai, discovered Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Parpura (TTP) which was originally called "Moschcowitz Syndrome". Dr. Charles A. Elsberg, known as the "Father of Neurosurgery", Elsberg was the dominant figure in the early days of neurosurgery in New York City. The name most frequently noted in the surgical records is Dr. Berg. It turns out, Dr. Albert A. Berg proved to be a visionary pioneer and key player in the development of abdominal surgery in the United States. From the article by Dr. Leon Ginzbert in the Journal of the Mount Sinai Hospital: [Dr. Berg's] tremendous capacity for work, his boldness and resolution , his extraordinary operative skill and his refusal to remain on the accepted path, had brought his service to an enviable position in the field of abdominal surgery. The most significant studies from his clinic were in the fields of gastroduodenal and jejunal ulcers. Other important contributions were made to the subjects of colonics, and more particulary rectal and recto-sigmoidal carcinoma...to chronicle adequately all of Dr. Berg's 'labors in the vineyard' would be to write an important chapter in the history of the development of abdominal surgery in the United States." Also known as a bibliophile, Albert A. Berg founded the New York Public Library's Berg Collection, endowed in his older brother Henry's memory. Item #2210

Price: $850.00

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