[AGRICULTURE] [HAWAII] By Nature Crowned - The King of Fruits; Hawaiian Pineapple Company Ltd. - Honolulu and San Francisco. Hawaiian Pineapple Co. Ltd.
[AGRICULTURE] [HAWAII] By Nature Crowned - The King of Fruits; Hawaiian Pineapple Company Ltd. - Honolulu and San Francisco
[AGRICULTURE] [HAWAII] By Nature Crowned - The King of Fruits; Hawaiian Pineapple Company Ltd. - Honolulu and San Francisco
[AGRICULTURE] [HAWAII] By Nature Crowned - The King of Fruits; Hawaiian Pineapple Company Ltd. - Honolulu and San Francisco
[AGRICULTURE] [HAWAII] By Nature Crowned - The King of Fruits; Hawaiian Pineapple Company Ltd. - Honolulu and San Francisco

[AGRICULTURE] [HAWAII] By Nature Crowned - The King of Fruits; Hawaiian Pineapple Company Ltd. - Honolulu and San Francisco

Bonine, 1922. Staplebound. This oversized pamphlet documents the current state in 1922 of The Hawaiian Pineapple Co. Ltd., founded in 1901 by it's original architect, James D. Dole. This tri-fold brochure contains photo illustrations along with descriptions of the history and development of the pineapple industry in Hawaii. Photos captions include: Panoramic View of The Factory, Planting the Fields, The Harvest, The Railroad's Part, The Trimming and Packing Tables, Machines Capable of Sealing a Million Cans Per Day, Motor Traction, The Labels, The Cafeteria of The Hawaiian Pineapple Company, Ltd., Where Women Employees May Rest, The Baseball Team, and many more. Interior cover layout features photo portraits of "Mr. James D. Dole" and "The Late Mr. A.C. Baumgartner. "Baumgartner was employed by The Hunt Brothers Company, an early California fruit-packing and cannery establishment, and is listed in this pamphlet as "Formerly Vice-President and Manager of the San Francisco Office of the Hawaiian Pineapple Company, Ltd."

In 1899, James D. Dole made his way from Boston to Hawaii with the intention of growing coffee. Instead, he decided to cultivate pineapples, and subsequently planted 75,000 pineapple slips on his twelve acres of land. Aware of the inherent risks of transporting this fruit, Dole started a small cannery, the funding for which came from San Francisco's Hunt Brothers as well as from family and friends back in his hometown of Boston. In 1911, Dole hired Henry G. Ginaca, chief draftsman of the Honolulu Iron Works. Ginaca, by 1913, had invented and perfected a machine (photo illustrated in pamphlet) that could core and peel 35-, and eventually, 100-pineapples per minute. Dole, a son of a preacher, felt the need to create a home for his workers. In 1922, the company purchased the island of L nai, and built the plantation village of L nai City to house Dole's plantation employees. Within its boundaries were schools, churches, playgrounds, baseball fields, a swimming pool, tennis courts, an auditorium, a cinema, and radio telephones. By the early 1920's, the company put in place a workman's compensation plan, a pension plan, and an opportunity for employees to attain stock ownership. In the 1930s, Dole became a minority shareholder in his own company, inadvertently giving over the majority stake to the sugar company, Castle & Cooke. This development, in turn, led to the end of Dole's involvement in the company. Light rubbing to folds, otherwise a remarkably clean copy. Color illustrated tri-fold pamphlet. Very good. Item #2051

Price: $225.00

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